The Science of Sustainability

Astronomy

Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

Science Event Pick: BOSS of the Night Sky

KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who use phenomena such as exploding stars and gravitational lenses to explore the dark cosmos.

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Maya Skies

Maya Skies

Armed with laser technology, Bay Area engineers are helping create detailed virtual records of the world's great monuments. Their realistic recreation of the Mexican ruins of Chichén Itzá is the basis for "Tales of Maya Skies," a new half-hour film about Maya astronomy designed especially for a planetarium. The film opens at Oakland's Chabot Space & Science Center on November 21. QUEST takes you behind the scenes.

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Producer's Notes: Maya Skies

Producer's Notes: Maya Skies

Go behind the scenes of Tales of Maya Skies, the new film produced by Oakland's Chabot Space and Science Center. The half-hour film about Maya astronomy opens at the center's planetarium on November 21.

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Equinox on Saturn Reveals Ring Ripples

Equinox on Saturn Reveals Ring Ripples

Equinox on Saturn reveals ring ripples.

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MOON Spells "Water"

MOON Spells "Water"

Even before NASA's LCROSS spacecraft is set to hit the Moon and hopefully kick up a cloud containing water, evidence for the presence of water on the Moon is mounting.

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Science Event Pick: LCROSS—Hitch-hiking to the Moon

Science Event Pick: LCROSS—Hitch-hiking to the Moon

As the satellite impact grows closer, NASA is making an effort to talk about the locally driven mission. Many of the upcoming talks are suitable for any audience, from kids to adults.

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Crab Nebula: Awesome Beauty From Destruction

Crab Nebula: Awesome Beauty From Destruction

As I write this blog, the age of the Crab Nebula is exactly 955 years and 40 days.

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Science Event Pick: Stardust in our Bones

Science Event Pick: Stardust in our Bones

David Lindberg, Professor of Integrative Biology at UC Berkeley, and Steve Croft, postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Astronomy at UC Berkeley will tie these great anniversaries in a unique lecture this weekend.

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Mars Rock Talks, Opportunity Listens

Mars Rock Talks, Opportunity Listens

Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity finds a meteorite on Mars that may shed more light on the history of Mars' atmosphere.

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Jupiter "Nuked" By Comet? (again)

Jupiter "Nuked" By Comet? (again)

An Earth-sized hole on Jupiter! What happened?

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3-D is Quidditch, but Much More, Too

3-D is Quidditch, but Much More, Too

Whether here to stay in film this time or another passing fad, 3-D technology will remain both a fascinating technology and valuable tool in science.

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Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

How do we know how far away celestial objects are? This shouldn't be taken for granted, as it's not as straightforward as sounding the depth of the ocean.

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"Mars Encounter:" An Inconvenient Hoax

"Mars Encounter:" An Inconvenient Hoax

As August approaches, the ghost of Mars returns to haunt us….

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Google Mars

Google Mars

I was sitting at my computer the other day, quietly exploring minute details of the surface of planet Mars…did I say quietly exploring the surface of Mars? You can too!

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Crash Landing

Crash Landing

NASA scientists in Mountain View are building a spaceship that they will deliberately crash into the moon in 2009, sending up a 37-mile high cloud of debris. Their goal? To possibly find water in the form of ice buried deep within one of the moon's poles.

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Reporter's Notes: Crash Landing

Reporter's Notes: Crash Landing

When the LCROSS satellite, nicknamed Centaur, smacks into the south pole of the moon in late October, it is expected to produce a plume of dust 37 miles high, which may be visible from Earth with a good backyard telescope. It will be visible in an arc from Hawaii to Texas.

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Hubble Gets a New Lease on Space

Hubble Gets a New Lease on Space

Hubble Space Telescope gets upgrades and repairs… for the last time.

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Do-It-Yourself Mini-Satellites

Do-It-Yourself Mini-Satellites

NASA will soon attempt to launch an unusual satellite. Most satellites are the size of a car, but this one is small enough to fit inside a glove compartment. Mini-satellites are reaching space in increasing numbers, thanks also to a do-it-yourself satellite program at Stanford University.

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Reporter's Notes: Do-It-Yourself Mini-Satellites

Reporter's Notes: Do-It-Yourself Mini-Satellites

It's a classic engineering story – a garage inventor spends years working in isolation, only to produce something that gets the attention of the world. Ok, the CubeSat story may not be quite as romantic, but it does have a lot of the same ingredients.

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Shooting the Moon

Shooting the Moon

Launching a spacecraft bound for the Moon with the deliberate intention of striking the Moon in a spectacular impact! Sounds like something out of a Jules Verne novel…

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