The Science of Sustainability

Astronomy

Science on the SPOT: Watching the Tides

Science on the SPOT: Watching the Tides

Ocean tides rise and fall twice a day, influenced by the gravitational forces of the sun and moon. QUEST explores how tides work and visits the oldest continually operating tidal gauge in the Western Hemisphere.

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Producer's Notes: Science on the SPOT: Watching the Tides

Producer's Notes: Science on the SPOT: Watching the Tides

A little white shack with the red roof along Crissy Field holds a lot of history and houses vitally important scientific instruments.

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Arsenic and Old Lakes: NASA Finds Life NOT As We Know It

Arsenic and Old Lakes: NASA Finds Life NOT As We Know It

NASA announces finding "life NOT as we know it" in the arsenic-laced waters of Mono Lake.

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Arsenic-Eating Bacteria Expands Definition of Life

Arsenic-Eating Bacteria Expands Definition of Life

A Bay Area biochemist has found a new strain of bacteria living in the briny shores of Mono Lake that can not only eat arsenic, a substance highly toxic to most organisms, but thrive on it.

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Tiny Satellites Give NASA Big Returns

Tiny Satellites Give NASA Big Returns

On Friday, a NASA satellite hitched a ride aboard a U.S. Air Force rocket that launched into space from Kodiak Island, Alaska. But this isn’t your typical satellite.

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Comet Hartley 2: Up Close and Personal

Comet Hartley 2: Up Close and Personal

On November 4, 2010, NASA's EPOXI flyby mission captured stunning close-up images of comet Hartley 2, and let web and satellite audiences fly along on an exciting live experience of the encounter.

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Earth-Sized Planets Could Be Common

Earth-Sized Planets Could Be Common

The Earth may not be as unique as we think it is. That's according to findings announced today by UC Berkeley. Astronomers there believe that Earth-sized planets may be more abundant in the universe than previously thought.

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A National Expo of Science

A National Expo of Science

This past weekend, I was on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. with a notebook and a very good pair of walking shoes. I spent the weekend exploring the inaugural expo of the USA Science and Engineering Festival.

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Much More Water on the Moon than Previously Thought

Much More Water on the Moon than Previously Thought

NASA scientists reveal that water on the moon isn’t spread out in vast oceans, but rather is concentrated in oases, and that the lunar surface appears to contain a wealth of other materials.

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Flashes in the Night

Flashes in the Night

"I was visiting my parents, and around ten o'clock I went outside to take a look at the stars, looked straight up—and I saw a strange flash of light. Did I see a UFO?"

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Reality Rocks:  Prospecting on Mars

Reality Rocks: Prospecting on Mars

It really is an amazing time to be alive: each new report from our exploration of space reminds me of the state of our knowledge of the solar system when I was a starry-eyed child, back in the 1960s.

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Aviation Authorities Prepare for Space Tourism

Aviation Authorities Prepare for Space Tourism

Several private companies are planning to offer the public rides into space starting in the next two to five years. Aviation authorities are preparing for a future in which airplanes and spaceships will share the air.

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The Observatory, the Castle, and the Web of Stars

The Observatory, the Castle, and the Web of Stars

It's now a year since the kickoff of Web of Stars, and I'm happy to report the program is still going strong! With a total of eight observing sessions under our belts, we now prepare to launch a second year of remote, Internet-linked astronomy with a new set of Cork schools!

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Spitzer Samples an Assortment of Asteroids

Spitzer Samples an Assortment of Asteroids

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has revealed that asteroids may have more variety than once imagined.

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The Jupiter Opposition

The Jupiter Opposition

We're approaching the Opposition of Jupiter, the time when Earth passes between the Sun and Jupiter, making the Earth-Jupiter distance its smallest.

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The Stars Are Coming Out Tonight!

The Stars Are Coming Out Tonight!

Looking to get out and enjoy the night sky? There are a variety of opportunities to go stargazing around the Bay Area whether or not you have a telescope!

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Panning for Starstuff

Panning for Starstuff

40,000 metric tonnes of material fall to Earth every year. How long can this go on?

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Mars Trek: The Next Generation

Mars Trek: The Next Generation

They just keep getting bigger and better-and curiouser. The next generation Mars rover-The Mars Science Laboratory, "Curiosity"-is well off the drawing board and into its gestation phase…no longer just the gleam in the eye of robotics engineers and Marsologists.

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NASA Moon Mission Reveals New Clues About Water on the Moon

NASA Moon Mission Reveals New Clues About Water on the Moon

NASA scientists reveal that water on the moon isn’t spread out in vast oceans, but rather is concentrated in oases, and that the lunar surface appears to contain a wealth of other materials.

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Northern California Scientists Helping Lead Project To Build World's Biggest Telescope

Northern California Scientists Helping Lead Project To Build World's Biggest Telescope

Scientists from the University of California are working to construct the largest telescope on Earth.

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