The Science of Sustainability

Astronomy

Photographing the Sun: Let Me Count The Ways

Photographing the Sun: Let Me Count The Ways

Turns out there are as many as ways to photograph as eclipse as there are to watch it. With a bit of preparation and the generosity of strangers, I got to experience five of them during Sunday's annular eclipse.

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The Once and Future Earth

The Once and Future Earth

How will the sun, moon, and Earth change in the far distant future? It may not make a big difference to us, but exploring the possible fate of our home and birthplace is a mind-bending journey.

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Tag Along On Science Adventures: The Field Trip Podcast

Tag Along On Science Adventures: The Field Trip Podcast

Season 2 of the science podcast, "The Field Trip" premieres today.

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Phoebe: Quirky, Mystical, Magical Moon

Phoebe: Quirky, Mystical, Magical Moon

Phoebe, a quirky outlying moon of Saturn, was once thought to be a captured comet, but now is believed by some scientists to be something much rarer: a captured planetesimal.

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Amateur Rocketeers Reach For The Stars

Amateur Rocketeers Reach For The Stars

For decades amateur rocket builders, or "rocketeers," have been trying to reach space. Now with advances in materials and technology, they're able to do it. QUEST travels to rocket launches in fallowed fields and barren deserts to learn more about this addictive hobby and to meet a group of passionate high school rocketeers.

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UFO? LGM? OMG! What is That Thing in the Sky?

UFO? LGM? OMG! What is That Thing in the Sky?

Ever seen something in the sky that was unusual, and which you couldn't explain? Here is a peek at my process of armchair evaluation of unexplained sightings.

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Is Anyone Out There?

Is Anyone Out There?

Planet hunters enter a new phase in their search for extra solar planets and alien life.

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Yuri’s Night in the Bay Area

Yuri’s Night in the Bay Area

51 years ago on April 12th, 1961, the Soviet Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin made history as the first human to enter outer space. Exactly 20 years later, the United States innovated the space age by launching the Space Shuttle (April 12th, 1981). Yuri’s Night, which commemorates these events, aims to celebrate humanity’s past present and future in space launches Yuri’s Night celebrations this week around the world.

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A Celestial Sports Extravaganza: Solar Triple Play

A Celestial Sports Extravaganza: Solar Triple Play

Get ready for a celestial sports extravaganza as you've never before seen—not all at once, anyway. Coming up in May and June this year, a matchup of three rare and beautiful celestial events, conveniently scheduled back to back to back for your viewing enjoyment.

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ISAAC Promotes Jupiter to Executive Planet

ISAAC Promotes Jupiter to Executive Planet

In a solar system shakeup, Jupiter has been promoted to Executive Planet. The International Solar Assembly Advisory Council has also endorsed Jupiter's choice of Saturn to be its Deputy Executive Planet.

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California's (and the World's) Oldest Rocks

California's (and the World's) Oldest Rocks

California has some pretty ancient rocks, but to experience really old rocks you don't need to look far.

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In Search of the Oldest Stuff: Rocks of Ages

In Search of the Oldest Stuff: Rocks of Ages

What's the oldest stuff you've ever seen, or better still, touched? Have you felt awe from contact with something of great antiquity? How old can stuff be?

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Solar FireworX: First X-Class Flare of the Year

Solar FireworX: First X-Class Flare of the Year

The first X-Class solar flare of the year went off yesterday, on March 7th, in spectacular fashion. Fortunately the flare went off where it's supposed to: on the Sun. Had this intense magneto-plasmic explosion gone off on Earth, we'd be toast; one of these releases an amount of energy on the order of 100 billion megatons of TNT.

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Starship Math: Are the Stars Our Destiny?

Starship Math: Are the Stars Our Destiny?

What would it take to send a spaceship to another star, all science fiction devices aside?

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Up All Night on NASA's Flying Telescope

Up All Night on NASA's Flying Telescope

The Obama Administration’s new budget for NASA was released last week, and calls for cuts to many space programs. But one California-based project is likely to get more money. The SOFIA flying observatory, a telescope mounted on an airplane, is considered more nimble and cost-effective than other projects. Reporter Lauren Sommer recently caught a ride as it flew over the Pacific Ocean.

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European Comet Blockbuster Currently in Production

European Comet Blockbuster Currently in Production

If the European Space Agency is successful, we'll be enjoying an exciting comet-landing mission blockbuster extravaganza in only 2-3 years!

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What Can Lake Vostok Tell Us About Europa?

What Can Lake Vostok Tell Us About Europa?

Does the prospect of life in subglacial Lake Vostok really point to the same on the icy satellite Europa? The answer may surprise you.

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The Sun Shows A Flare for the Dramatic

The Sun Shows A Flare for the Dramatic

A solar flare, associated with the big sunspot numbered 1402, erupted on January 23rd, launching a coronal mass ejection–a "cantaloupe" of plasma that makes Earth look like a grape. Rated as an M9-class flare, it packed umph just shy of what's necessary for adult "X-class" flaredom, the most powerful kind.

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Treasure from the Sky

Treasure from the Sky

The recently authenticated fall of meteorites from Mars excites fever dreams as well as scientific fervor.

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The Stars Within an Eyelash's Reach

The Stars Within an Eyelash's Reach

I want to take a moment, again, to contemplate the vastness of the Universe…and expect an epic fail….

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