The Science of Sustainability

Astronomy

Reporter's Notes: Do-It-Yourself Mini-Satellites

Reporter's Notes: Do-It-Yourself Mini-Satellites

It's a classic engineering story – a garage inventor spends years working in isolation, only to produce something that gets the attention of the world. Ok, the CubeSat story may not be quite as romantic, but it does have a lot of the same ingredients.

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Shooting the Moon

Shooting the Moon

Launching a spacecraft bound for the Moon with the deliberate intention of striking the Moon in a spectacular impact! Sounds like something out of a Jules Verne novel…

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Springtime on Mars

Springtime on Mars

It's spring again, that time of year when my thoughts return to… blasts of carbon dioxide gas jetting up from beneath the frigid layer of dry ice below

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Goodbye to the Bevatron

Goodbye to the Bevatron

For the last 18 years, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has had the physics equivalent of a rusty pickup truck parked in its front yard. Now, the 1950s era Bevatron is being demolished, and a chapter in the Bay Area's history of high level physics research comes to a close.

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When a Cosmo's More Than a Cocktail: Yuri's Night at Cal Academy

When a Cosmo's More Than a Cocktail: Yuri's Night at Cal Academy

208 parties in 46 countries on eight continents celebrated Yuri Alexyevich Gagarin between April 6 and 12th of this year. Who is Yuri and why does he deserve such accolades?

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Is the Sun Pulling a Rip Van Winkle?

Is the Sun Pulling a Rip Van Winkle?

The Sun seems to be unusually quiet these last few years–and solar scientists are excited by this long, deep slumber….

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QUEST Quiz: The Moon

QUEST Quiz: The Moon

In an average lifetime, a person experiences about 936 full Moons. So, how old is the Moon? How was it formed? Take the QUEST Quiz to find out how much you REALLY know about Earth's Moon.

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NASA Ames Rocket to the Moon

NASA Ames Rocket to the Moon

Call them demolition derby astrophysicists: NASA scientists in Mountain View deliberately crashed an unmanned rocket into the moon on October 9th, 2009. Their goal? To find water, in the form of ice, which could one day support a moon base. On November 15th, 2009, they announced they had found it. QUEST looks at the planning and run-up to the big event.

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Producer's Notes: LCROSS Rocket to the Moon

Producer's Notes: LCROSS Rocket to the Moon

The goal is to see if water exists on the moon and if it does, buried deep beneath the lunar soil, accumulating over millions of years of impacts with comets, it would accelerate our efforts to establish a permanent lunar base.

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Asteroid Apophis–Hit or Miss?

Asteroid Apophis–Hit or Miss?

Friday the 13th, April, 2029: If you're superstitious, this might not be a good day to schedule a near-Earth asteroid encounter.

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Web Extra: Nudging with Nukes

Web Extra: Nudging with Nukes

Most scientists agree that using nuclear explosives to deflect an incoming asteroid is a bad idea. But Astrophysicist David Dearborn from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been heating up the debate with his theories about how nuclear explosives could be used effectively to nudge an asteroid into a new orbit that causes it to miss the Earth entirely.

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Asteroid Hunters

Asteroid Hunters

Everyone knows that eight planets orbit the Sun. But thousands of other objects, including icy comets and football field-sized asteroids, are also zooming around our solar system. And some of them could be on a collision course with Earth. QUEST explores how these Near Earth Objects are being tracked and what scientists are saying should be done to prevent a deadly impact.

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Producer's Notes: Asteroid Hunters

Producer's Notes: Asteroid Hunters

On March 3rd, 2009 at 1:40PM GMT, just a mere month after we’d finished the Asteroid Hunters segment, an asteroid of up to 165 feet in diameter snuck up on us, coming within approximately 37,000 miles from a direct impact with Earth.

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First Star I See… In My Life!

First Star I See… In My Life!

What's that up in the sky? A… uh… an… uh…. Golly, never seen that before…

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NASA's Kepler: Staring Down Earth-like Planets

NASA's Kepler: Staring Down Earth-like Planets

For several years there has been a lot of buzz about the detection of extra-solar planets, or exoplanets: planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. However, due to the limits in technology and observational capabilities, to date only large, gas giant planets orbiting close to the stars (so called "Hot Jupiters") have been found, with a possible exception or two.

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Age of Aquarius: Are We There Yet?

Age of Aquarius: Are We There Yet?

"Can you tell me about the upcoming beginning of the Age of Aquarius?" said the voice on the phone. "I heard that it starts this Saturday…."

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A Long and Winding DNA

A Long and Winding DNA

How long would the DNA from every living thing on Earth stretch? Could we make it to the next star? The next galaxy? The end of the Universe?

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Methane on Mars? Moooooooo!

Methane on Mars? Moooooooo!

Methane on Mars? Really? What does that mean? If you know anything about the source of most of Earth's atmospheric methane gas, you already know the answer: possible life.

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Globe At Night:  Measuring Light Pollution with Human Eyes

Globe At Night: Measuring Light Pollution with Human Eyes

Want a chance to do some "citizen" science, contribute to an international investigation, and have some fun to boot? An opportunity is coming up in March: Globe At Night. All you need is your eyes….

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O Say Can You Cesium-133? The Leap Second of 2008

O Say Can You Cesium-133? The Leap Second of 2008

Did you make good use of the extra second you received in 2008? A little extra sleep perhaps? Did you notice the extra time?

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