The Science of Sustainability

QUEST Community Science Blog

Depression Advancements

Depression Advancements

One in six Americans will experience a major episode of depression at some point in their lives. And yet the drugs commonly used to treat the disease have been described as "blunt instruments"

by researchers. Newer approaches use magnets to stimulate some of the neurological signals that underlie depression.

Continue Reading

Reporter's Notes: Depression Advancements

Reporter's Notes: Depression Advancements

This radio story tries to cram a lot into five minutes, so if you don't find what you need here, put a comment on the blog, below and I'll see if I can't provide a lead to more information.

Continue Reading

Neil Armstrong's Lunar Footprint Turns 40

Neil Armstrong's Lunar Footprint Turns 40

What were you doing 40 years ago, on July 20th, 1969, when the first human foot (booted, not bare) made its impression on the gritty surface of the Moon?

Continue Reading

QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

QUEST Lab: Newton's Laws of Motion

Paul Doherty of the Exploratorium performs a "sit-down" lecture on one of Sir Issac Newton's most famous laws.

Continue Reading

Hog Wild

Hog Wild

In 1924, a hunter purposely released a handful of wild boar in Monterey County. Now the pigs number in the hundreds of thousands and reside in all but two of California's 58 counties. Big, fast, smart and hungry, these animals often out-compete native species and damage fragile native ecosystems.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes: Hog Wild

Producer's Notes: Hog Wild

I knew going into this story that we might ruffle some feathers. But one of the things that made this story so intriguing to me is that it would bring up some questions about where people stand on what can be a pretty touchy subject.

Continue Reading

3-D is Quidditch, but Much More, Too

3-D is Quidditch, but Much More, Too

Whether here to stay in film this time or another passing fad, 3-D technology will remain both a fascinating technology and valuable tool in science.

Continue Reading

Museum 2.0

Museum 2.0

Call it Museum 2.0. One of our most traditional institutions is undergoing a 21st century re-design. In an effort to keep up with changing times, more and more museums are turning to Twitter, Wikis and online communities to ask for the public's help in designing their exhibits.

Continue Reading

Reporter's Notes: Museum 2.0

Reporter's Notes: Museum 2.0

Hard economic times and changing social trends have some museums undergoing a 21st century re-design. The focus is on creating more visitor-centered exhibits using new media tools and more input from the public.

Continue Reading

Get a Dog and Save the Planet

Get a Dog and Save the Planet

Are pets, and dogs in particular, a step in the right direction in the battle against global warming and the fight for energy security? Is Underdog more than a cartoon?

Continue Reading

Bay Bridge Rising

Bay Bridge Rising

Bay Bridge construction and engineering brought to life by the award winning website baybridge360.

Continue Reading

Why I Do Science: Healy Hamilton

Why I Do Science: Healy Hamilton

Could you have a career studying rare Amazon River Dolphins, tiny octopuses and endangered sea horses? Healy Hamilton does, and she works with kids to encourages them to become scientists.

Continue Reading

Profile: Sylvia Earle

Profile: Sylvia Earle

She's spent much of the last five decades exploring and protecting the world's oceans. Find out why legendary marine biologist Sylvia Earle thinks that we may only have a few years left to save what she calls "the blue heart of the planet."

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes – Why I do Science: Healy Hamilton

Producer's Notes – Why I do Science: Healy Hamilton

When I first head about Healy Hamilton at a meeting QUEST was having with the California Academy of Sciences, I just knew I was going to like her.

Continue Reading

Producer's Notes – Profile: Sylvia Earle

Producer's Notes – Profile: Sylvia Earle

Everyone knows who Sylvia Earle is, right? Not so. Despite the fact that she’s been at the forefront of marine science and ocean exploration for more than 40 years, she is not a household name.

Continue Reading

Risky Business: Genes Just Part of the Story

Risky Business: Genes Just Part of the Story

When talking about genetic pre-disposition to a condition, make sure you understand both the increased risk factor and the general risk.As the geneticist at the Ask a Geneticist blog, I get a lot of questions about diseases that run in the family.  They usually run along the lines of, "My mother had diabetes, what is […]

Continue Reading

The Corpse Smells of Chocolate?

The Corpse Smells of Chocolate?

The Corpse Flower also known as the Titan Arum is best known for the smell it emits when in bloom. It only blooms for 24 to 48 hours and it emits a smell that can range from rotting garbage to a dead corpse.

Continue Reading

Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

Far Out, Man: Measuring Astronomical Distances

How do we know how far away celestial objects are? This shouldn't be taken for granted, as it's not as straightforward as sounding the depth of the ocean.

Continue Reading

Nature Play: Notes from the Field

Nature Play: Notes from the Field

At Nature Play, a new Oakland Zoo camp, campers need little guidance to make peace with Nature, and each other.

Continue Reading

New Nanoparticles Shed Light on Cell Behavior

New Nanoparticles Shed Light on Cell Behavior

Happily, while Michael Crichton's nanoparticles coordinate an attack on a your vital organs, these new bright, stable particles behave more like benign light bulbs in your cells.

Continue Reading