The Science of Sustainability

QUEST Community Science Blog

Corporations Behaving Badly… and Well

Corporations Behaving Badly… and Well

There are those who, for selfish, near-term interests, work hard to obscure the truth and only pretend to be part of the solution. When it comes to products and information, buyer beware.

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The Largest Land Mammal That Ever Lived

The Largest Land Mammal That Ever Lived

With Extreme Mammals opening in less than a month, new boxes and displays are popping up every day.

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Singularities Surround Us

Singularities Surround Us

Thinking about our robotic future is interesting and important, but don't trust anyone who thinks they know exactly what and when.

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An Urban Layover for Birds: MLK Jr. Regional Shoreline

An Urban Layover for Birds: MLK Jr. Regional Shoreline

Squeezed between the Oakland International Airport and the Coliseum lies one of the best kept secrets of the bay: Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline Park, a birding hot spot. I had no idea.

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23andMe: Not Just for Fun Anymore

23andMe: Not Just for Fun Anymore

23andMe has gone away from being a place where you get your DNA tested for coolness’ sake to one with a focus on health and/or ancestry.  With this change has come a much-improved product for people interested in what their DNA tells them about their carrier status for a variety of genetic diseases.

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Battle Over Public Power

Battle Over Public Power

This week, voters on both sides of a contentious measure set for California's June ballot will take the stage in a public hearing in San Francisco. Proposition 16 has to do with how electricity will be delivered to our homes, and by whom. The issue is shaping up to be an epic showdown between local non-profit groups and the utility giant PG&E. Amy Standen has more.

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Shifting Sands of Far-Off Lands

Shifting Sands of Far-Off Lands

What started out to be a workaday chore—replacing a broken motor in an exhibit—panned out to be a voyage of discovery to the shifting sands of another world.

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Reporter's Notes: Battle Over Public Power

Reporter's Notes: Battle Over Public Power

Three months before the state election, Prop 16 has made headlines in every major state newspaper.

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Wither The Lawn

Wither The Lawn

After three years of drought, California is finally getting some wet relief. Yet a series of strong storms doesn't end the state's need to conserve water. A new California law will impose restrictions on landscaping for decades to come. Katharine Mieszkowski reports on the future of the suburban lawn.

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Fighting Words

Fighting Words

Words matter to scientists. The scientific method is a structure through which scientists test theories through experiment, and then share the results with other scientists.

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Reporter's Notes: Putting Landscaping on a Water Budget

Reporter's Notes: Putting Landscaping on a Water Budget

Is your yard a dated relic of California's water guzzling past, or, an exemplar of the drought-tolerant future that the state's trying to nudge us all towards?

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Holding Hands with an Octopus

Holding Hands with an Octopus

A week ago on Tuesday morning, a co-worker and I were able to go behind the scenes and visit with the Giant Red Octopus and his trainer.

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22andHim

22andHim

A doctor from China contacted me through this blog with some exciting news.  He had found a patient with 44 chromosomes instead of the usual 46

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Teaching the Brain To See

Teaching the Brain To See

Thanks to stem cells and other cutting-edge technologies, doctors hope they may one day be able to restore sight to people who were born without it, or lost it, later in life. But a rare case here in the Bay Area suggests that curing blindness may be more than meets the eye.

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Celestial Navigation: Finding Your Way in the Dark

Celestial Navigation: Finding Your Way in the Dark

Celestial Navigation – it’s a special topic for me as it blends my interest in astronomy with my long time fascination for things nautical: ships, exploration, adventure, and global geometry.

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Reporter's Notes: Can You Teach A Brain To See?

Reporter's Notes: Can You Teach A Brain To See?

When Mike was three years old, he opened up a jar containing an explosive chemical that the miners had left behind. The accident left him nearly blind. Forty-two years later, doctors fixed one of his eyes in a series of two procedures.

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Reporter's Notes: Coping with Ants at Home

Reporter's Notes: Coping with Ants at Home

Argentine ants have had amazing success as an invasive species in the US. Their West Coast super colony numbers in the billions and spans from Mexico to Oregon. But aside from invading homes, they've had a dramatic effect on native ants and local ecosystems.

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Whom Do You Trust?

Whom Do You Trust?

Who can you trust nowadays? That question has some importance for me today.

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Famous African-American Scientists and Innovators: Part III

Famous African-American Scientists and Innovators: Part III

Black History Month is a remembrance of important people and events in the history of the African-Americans and takes place February of each year.

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Welcome to Rangoon, California

Welcome to Rangoon, California

You don't really appreciate how much California have given up on equal education until you spend some time in a poorer district.

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