The Science of Sustainability

QUEST Community Science Blog

Producer's Notes: Amazing Jellies

Producer's Notes: Amazing Jellies

What are the longest animals in the world? Hint: you’ve most likely never heard of them. They glow in the dark and have many stomachs, mouths and tentacles – sometimes hundreds.

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My 3000th Great Grandpa was a Neanderthal

My 3000th Great Grandpa was a Neanderthal

New research shows that Europeans and Asians have a bit of Neanderthal in them. What was surprising about this latest research is that most of the previous data argued against human-Neanderthal hanky panky.

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Editor's Notes: Race for Renewables

Editor's Notes: Race for Renewables

Where did California go wrong? And as other states try to learn from its lessons, does the Golden State have any hope of reaching its next ambitious target – 33 percent renewable by 2020?

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Race for Renewables

Race for Renewables

With its wind and solar resources, California is known as a hotbed of renewable energy. Driving that development is an ambitious goal: by 2020, state law requires utilities to generate one third of their electricity from renewable sources. But the road to clean energy is full of obstacles. Lauren Sommer reports on how we got here and the chances of meeting our big green power goals.

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Producer's Notes: Skulls at Cal Academy

Producer's Notes: Skulls at Cal Academy

If a dead marine mammal washes up on our beaches, from Bodega Bay to Año Nuevo, the California Academy of Sciences Department of Ornithology & Mammalogy gets a call.

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Chickens in the House

Chickens in the House

Raising chickens offers a good life for our feathered friends, a sense of peace, a connection to nature and our food source, eggs with high nutritional value, a composting and fertilization system, free entertainment and another reason to rise and shine.

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Science on the SPOT: Skulls at the Cal Academy

Science on the SPOT: Skulls at the Cal Academy

In our second episode of Science on the SPOT, join us on a behind-the-scenes trip deep into the massive collection of marine mammal skulls at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. You'd be surprised how much you can learn about an animal's life– and death– by reading their bones.

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QUEST Quiz: The Sun

QUEST Quiz: The Sun

Test your knowledge about this mysterious, awesome and most vital of stars.

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Journey Into The Sun

Journey Into The Sun

Scientists at Stanford University and Lockheed Martin are playing pivotal roles in a nearly billion-dollar NASA mission to explore the sun. A spacecraft launched in early 2010 is obtaining IMAX-like images of the sun every second of the day, generating more data than any NASA mission in history.

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Web Extra: Music of the Sun

Web Extra: Music of the Sun

In this QUEST web extra, Stanford University astrophysicist Todd Hoeksema explains how solar sound waves are a vital ingredient to the science of helioseismology, in which the interior properties of the sun are probed by analyzing and tracking the surface sound waves that bounce into and out of the Sun.

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Producer's Notes: Journey Into The Sun

Producer's Notes: Journey Into The Sun

Astrophysicists who track space weather today are at a stage Earth weather forecasters were roughly three decades ago. This is about to change.

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Baby Brain Development

Baby Brain Development

Thousands of babies are born each year in the U.S. with brain defects that can cause lifelong disability or even death. UC-San Francisco neurologists and pediatricians are developing better diagnostic tools and treatments to help brain-damaged babies not only survive, but grow up to live more normal lives.

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Reporter's Notes: Baby Brain Development

Reporter's Notes: Baby Brain Development

It is well known that strokes can happen in the elderly. But what many people don't know is that babies suffer strokes.

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Reflections on Friends and Heroes

Reflections on Friends and Heroes

One of the things I enjoy most about my job as a media producer is the opportunity to interact with the amazing people, places and things we profile in our stories.

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Has the Hydrogen Highway Become a Good Idea Again?

Has the Hydrogen Highway Become a Good Idea Again?

Now, after an exciting discovery at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the hydrogen highway is a good idea whose time may have come around.

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Local Hair Cleaning Up Gulf Oil

Local Hair Cleaning Up Gulf Oil

Clean up for the recent spill in the San Francisco Bay was partially cleaned up by hair. Hair is a great catalyst in absorbing oil.

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Hepatitis C: The Silent Epidemic

Hepatitis C: The Silent Epidemic

Hepatitis C is a virus that causes cirrhosis of the liver and liver cancer. It's the leading cause for liver transplants in the U.S., and an estimated 4 million Americans have the disease. Current treatments are difficult to tolerate and are often ineffective, but recent breakthroughs from Bay Area scientists may soon produce a cure for the disease that claims more than 10,000 American lives each year.

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Producer's Notes: Hepatitis C, Hope and Humanity

Producer's Notes: Hepatitis C, Hope and Humanity

I came to realize that hope has a lot to do with science. It’s the driving force for those who seek cures, for those who work to protect the environment, for those who search for solutions to the pain and problems facing humanity.

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Greening The Grow

Greening The Grow

Voters in California will consider a measure on the November ballot to legalize and tax marijuana. Amid the debate over pros and cons, another issue has been gaining visibility — the environmental damage pot cultivation can incur. Illegal pesticide use and creek water diversion at large-scale outdoor operations are well-documented. But environmental concerns are also growing over indoor marijuana cultivation, as Lisa Morehouse reports.

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What if the Geneticists are Wrong?

What if the Geneticists are Wrong?

What if most people or families had unique DNA differences that led to their disease? Then scientists have been going about finding the causes of genetic disease in the wrong way.

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