The Science of Sustainability

Sheraz Sadiq

Sheraz Sadiq

Sheraz Sadiq is an Emmy Award-winning producer at San Francisco PBS affiliate KQED. In 2012, he received the AAAS Kavli Science Journalism award for a story he produced about the seismic retrofit of the Hetch Hetchy water delivery system which serves the San Francisco Bay Area. In addition to producing television content for KQED Science, he has also created online features and written news articles on scientific subjects ranging from astronomy to synthetic biology.

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Sheraz Sadiq's Latest Posts

Silicon Valley Goes to Space

Silicon Valley Goes to Space

In this video story, learn how commercial space ventures are taking off, from mining the moon to space tourism.

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Searching for Life on Mars

Searching for Life on Mars

Watch how the NASA Curiosity rover is the most sophisticated rover ever deployed on Mars.

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Future of You

Future of You

Explore new technologies driving a digital health revolution to hack and track our lives.

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Condors vs. Lead Bullets

Condors vs. Lead Bullets

Once nearly extinct, California condors are making a steady recovery. But a new threat– lead poisoning from old bullets– is slowing progress, leaving scientists between wildlife preservation and the politics of hunting.

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California Voters to Decide $7.5 Billion Water Bond Measure

California Voters to Decide $7.5 Billion Water Bond Measure

Learn about Proposition One, which would issue billions in bonds for water projects.

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QUEST TV: Highway to Hydrogen

QUEST TV: Highway to Hydrogen

Although auto makers have spent decades and billions of dollars to develop hydrogen fuel cell cars, only a few hundred of them are on the nation's roads. With new refueling stations in development and new models recently unveiled, are these zero-emission vehicles finally ready to roll?

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Using Social Media to Rescue Food

Using Social Media to Rescue Food

In the U.S., more than 30 million tons of food end up in landfills each year. The food waste occurs throughout the food chain, from farm to table. But now social media is being mobilized to rescue surplus food and keep it from going to waste.

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Fighting Food Waste

Fighting Food Waste

Forty percent of the food produced in the U.S. goes uneaten. From "farm to fork", there are many reasons for food waste, including consumer demand for perfect produce and confusion over expiration dates printed on packaged foods. This massive waste occurs as one in six Americans struggles with hunger every day, even in affluent regions such as Silicon Valley.

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Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

Science on the SPOT: Preserving the Forest of the Sea

UC Berkeley's University Herbarium boasts one of the largest and oldest collections of seaweed in the United States. Herbarium curator Kathy Ann Miller is leading a massive project to preserve digitally nearly 80,000 specimens of west coast seaweed.

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Why I Do Science: Stephen Palumbi

Why I Do Science: Stephen Palumbi

In this edition of "Why I Do Science", we hear from Stephen Palumbi, a world-renowned marine biologist and director of the Hopkins Marine Station in Pacific Grove, California.

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Black Holes: Objects of Attraction

Black Holes: Objects of Attraction

Black holes have been the stuff of science fiction since their discovery in the late sixties. But now a new, nimble NASA telescope is using its powerful x-ray vision to hunt for these abundant yet invisible, massive space oddities.

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Field Notes: Dan Costa in Antarctica

Field Notes: Dan Costa in Antarctica

QUEST Producer Sheraz Sadiq interviews Bay Area filmmaker and musician Jesse Hiatt about the experience of filming in one of the world's most extreme environments. His breathtaking footage was edited into the QUEST segment, "Field Notes: Dan Costa in Antarctica."

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X-ray Microscope: Seeing Cells in 3-D

X-ray Microscope: Seeing Cells in 3-D

At the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, scientists are using a cutting-edge microscope, the first of its kind in the world, to image whole cells in 3-D with the penetrating power of x-rays. The new images generated by the microscope are offering a deeper, more precise understanding of cellular structures and how they change with diseases.

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Astronomers Discover an 'Odd Couple' of Planets, Dementia Protein and Traumas Linked: KQED Science News Roundup

Astronomers Discover an 'Odd Couple' of Planets, Dementia Protein and Traumas Linked: KQED Science News Roundup

Here's today's roundup of science, nature and environment news from the Bay Area and beyond. Astronomers discover an 'odd couple' of planetsThe Kepler spacecraft has detected a pair of extrasolar planets with orbits so close that at times the larger planet looms more than twice the size of the full moon in the second planet's […]

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Exploring Corals of the Deep

Exploring Corals of the Deep

Off California's coastline, thousands of feet below the deep blue ocean where the sun's rays don't reach, teems a diverse community of deep sea corals. Armed with unmanned submarines equipped with robotic arms, sensors and HD cameras, scientists are exploring this treasure trove of corals and the rich marine life living among them.

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Edible Insects: Finger Lickin' Grub

Edible Insects: Finger Lickin' Grub

"Insects do not taste like chicken," said Daniella Martin, a charismatic advocate of eating low – make that really low – on the food chain. Through public lectures, cooking demonstrations and her 'Girl Meets Bug' website, Martin preaches the gospel of why, in her opinion, more people should munch on mealworms, crunch a cricket or feast on plump bee larvae.

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Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes

Hetch Hetchy Aqueduct: Big Fixes for Big Quakes

The San Francisco Public Utilities Commission is hard at work on a $4.6 billion, decade-long construction project to overhaul the Hetch Hetchy water system, which delivers water from the Hetch Hetchy reservoir in Yosemite National Park and five local reservoirs to 2.5 million residents in the Bay Area.

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Induced Seismicity: Man-Made Earthquakes

Induced Seismicity: Man-Made Earthquakes

In California, more renewable energy comes from geothermal energy than solar and wind, combined. Today, a new technology known as Enhanced Geothermal Systems has the potential to extract even more heat and consequently energy to power steam turbines, but it’s not without challenges.

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Sidelined: Sports Concussions

Sidelined: Sports Concussions

Studying the effects of a concussion at its source, inside the brain, is no easy feat. Says Dr. Geoffrey Manley, Chief of Neurosurgery at San Francisco General Hospital, "What we’re dealing with is one of the most complicated injuries in the most complicated organ in the body."

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Why I Do Science: Dan Costa

Why I Do Science: Dan Costa

One of the great things about my job is to be able to talk to some of the world's greatest and most charismatic scientists, like Professor Dan Costa of UC Santa Cruz.

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