The Science of Sustainability

Eleanor Nelsen

Eleanor Nelsen

Eleanor Nelsen is a graduate student in chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. When she's not studying rhodium chemistry, Eleanor enjoys reading and writing about science. She lives in Madison with her husband Luke and their growing collection of livestock.

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Eleanor Nelsen's Latest Posts

Will Recycling Phosphorus Help Stop Algae Blooms?

Will Recycling Phosphorus Help Stop Algae Blooms?

A new Wisconsin facility aims to clean up algae-plagued lakes by stripping phosphorus out of wastewater.

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Farmers' Markets Are Good for Communities…Right?

Farmers' Markets Are Good for Communities…Right?

A new project at the University of Wisconsin will help farmers' markets figure out how to meet the needs of their communities.

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What is an Heirloom Tomato, Anyway?

What is an Heirloom Tomato, Anyway?

In this short animation we tackle the confusing terms “heirloom,” “hybrid,” and “genetically modified,” and explain one reason the difference matters.

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Microgrids: Electricity Goes Local

Microgrids: Electricity Goes Local

Microgrids, which can connect to the main grid but also have their own, independent energy supply, increase energy efficiency and keep expensive power outages from spreading.

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As Tropics Expand, Tropical Storms Follow

As Tropics Expand, Tropical Storms Follow

Tropical storms like hurricanes and typhoons are reaching their peak intensity further and further from the equator.

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Sweet and Deadly: Bat-Borne Virus Brews in Bangladesh’s Date Palm Pots

Sweet and Deadly: Bat-Borne Virus Brews in Bangladesh’s Date Palm Pots

Deforestation and increased interactions between humans and wildlife are implicated in the spread of the Nipah virus.

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Saving Our Seeds

Saving Our Seeds

In this video, a public library in Wisconsin joins the global movement to help secure the future of our food supply.

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A Hidden World Thrives Below the Snow

A Hidden World Thrives Below the Snow

Although the layer of snow that blankets much of the Northern Hemisphere every winter looks inhospitable, it’s actually a cozy refuge for many plants and animals. But as the world warms up, this safe haven is disappearing.

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Building Better Forests

Building Better Forests

Scientists in Wisconsin are drawing on both new research and traditional Native American knowledge to create forests that will be more resilient in the face of climate change.

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Human Health in a Changing Climate

Human Health in a Changing Climate

Public heath expert Jonathan Patz reveals some of the less obvious effects of a changing climate on our health, and offers up some ideas about how to combat climate change and improve human health at the same time.

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Could Ants Teach the Biofuel Industry a Thing or Two?

Could Ants Teach the Biofuel Industry a Thing or Two?

How leaf-cutter ants and fungus gardens could provide the model for sustainably producing biofuels.

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Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

Meet the Natives: Wild Bees

The United States is home to some 4,000 native bee species. In this video, entomologist Claudio Gratton explores whether these wild pollinators can keep agriculture buzzing as honeybee populations struggle to survive.

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Students Take Action to Restore Biodiversity and Revitalize a Community

Students Take Action to Restore Biodiversity and Revitalize a Community

Sixth graders at a charter school in Madison, Wisconsin, lead the charge to restore a local park and play a key role in efforts to revitalize a struggling community.

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Gamers Going Green: New Video Game Turns Players Into Biofuel Farmers

Gamers Going Green: New Video Game Turns Players Into Biofuel Farmers

A new video game designed by computer scientists and ecologists is poised to shed light on the best way to manage biofuel farms.

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