The Science of Sustainability

Craig Miller

Craig is KQED's science editor, specializing in weather, climate, water & energy issues, with a little seismology thrown in just to shake things up. Prior to his current position, he launched and led the station's award-winning multimedia project, Climate Watch. Craig is also an accomplished writer/producer of television documentaries, with a focus on natural resource issues.

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Craig Miller's Latest Posts

Another Try For California's Second National Conservation Area

Another Try For California's Second National Conservation Area

Just north of the Bay Area is a vast and varied expanse of land and water that could be in line for new federal protections. The proposed Berryessa-Snow Mountain National Conservation Area would link wilderness zones and other lands in five counties. But it’s been a tough sell in some parts.

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Aboard the Tugnacious With Dr. Doom

Aboard the Tugnacious With Dr. Doom

The scientist dubbed “Dr. Doom” for his dire pronouncements about California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is retiring after 33 years working on the troubled ecosystem that's central to California's water supply.

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Sierra Club Director: Time to Take Climate Action to the Streets

Sierra Club Director: Time to Take Climate Action to the Streets

For the first time in the Sierra Club's 120-year history, its national head was arrested for an act of civil disobedience. It signals a new, more aggressive stance for the organization spawned by John Muir.

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Scientists More Outspoken on Exteme Weather-Climate Links

Scientists More Outspoken on Exteme Weather-Climate Links

One of the giants of climate science talks about extreme weather…and trashes California's plan to cut emissions.

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So How Much Does Carbon Cost?

So How Much Does Carbon Cost?

Now we have a first glimpse of how California's experiment in carbon trading is working out. The state's first auction of industrial permits for greenhouse gases actually happened last week–but results were released on Monday.

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Where Do California's Carbon Emissions Come From?

Where Do California's Carbon Emissions Come From?

Cap-and-trade will initially regulate the industrial sector and utilities. Eventually, fuels will be phased into the program, too. It's all part of AB 32, the law that requires California to bring greenhouse gas emissions back to 1990 levels by 2020. Here's a breakdown of where the emissions come from.

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Cap-and-Trade: The Glossary

Cap-and-Trade: The Glossary

You can’t navigate the new world of carbon trading unless you know the lingo. Here are some key terms.

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Water Banks: A Hedge Against Shrinking Supplies in a Changing Climate

Water Banks: A Hedge Against Shrinking Supplies in a Changing Climate

For years, farms and cities have pumped water out to meet their needs. But now, as water supplies dwindle, there’s a major movement afoot to put some water back.

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California's Farm Belt Didn't Dodge the Summer Heat Wave

California's Farm Belt Didn't Dodge the Summer Heat Wave

Autumn is here, so says the calendar. Living on the coast, it might be easy to think that California escaped the heat wave suffered by much of the nation this summer. While that may be true for most of the large coastal population centers, it was a different story for much of the state's interior farm belt.

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Heat, Salt and Pests Threaten California Fields

Heat, Salt and Pests Threaten California Fields

California's warming climate is having a big impact on farmers. Find out more from our multimedia series, "Heat and Harvest."

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Changing Foghorns

Changing Foghorns

Lightkeeper Peter Berkhout takes QUEST radio reporter Craig Miller to see a genuine rarity: one of perhaps two or three remaining vintage foghorns anywhere in the U.S. that’s still in working order.

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Web Extra: From Moo to Methane Slideshow

Web Extra: From Moo to Methane Slideshow

Think cow manure is just waste? See how manure becomes renewable energy in this tour of the Fiscalini Farms dairy.

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Finding a Home for Big Solar – Part One

Finding a Home for Big Solar – Part One

California has set ambitious goals for a transition to clean, renewable energy: 33 percent by 2020. Some are skeptical that the goal is within reach.QUEST and Climate Watch continue to examine the promise and pitfalls of this historic transformation. Craig Miller reports on one Silicon Valley company's controversial proposal for Panoche Valley.

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National Park Service – Soundscapes

National Park Service – Soundscapes

In 2003, following a year-long nature sounds study in Sequoia National Park, Craig Miller, then founder of Vox Terra (now Senior Producer of Climate Watch) and Bernie Krause, founder of Wild Sanctuary, co-produced this four-and-a-half minute "journey." It takes you from the familiar cacophony of the urban soundscape to a serene spot in Sequoia Park. Take the journey and see how desensitized to urban noise you've become.

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The Quietest Place I've Been: Reporter's Notes for Soundscapes of National Parks

The Quietest Place I've Been: Reporter's Notes for Soundscapes of National Parks

Plopped down on a sand dune in Death Valley, one gains a certain appreciation for both the national parks and natural "quiet."

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Reporter's Notes: Do We Need Nuclear?

Reporter's Notes: Do We Need Nuclear?

More people appear to be saying "yes" these days, even if grudgingly. The question is: Is it too late?

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Web Extra: Visit to the Farallon Islands – Audio Slideshow

Web Extra: Visit to the Farallon Islands – Audio Slideshow

Get a behind-the-scenes look of QUEST's trip to the Farallones and find out what's it's like to live on these rocky, remote islands – for both the birds and the scientists who study them.

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Reporter's Notes: California at the Tipping Point

Reporter's Notes: California at the Tipping Point

The conventional wisdom is that a warming planet means more wildfires–and in many cases the conventional wisdom is right. But globally it's a more complex question.

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Urban Heat Islands

Urban Heat Islands

Buildings, concrete, asphalt, tar roof tops and industry have caused cities to reach higher temperatures than surrounding rural areas. Now, green-minded architects are taking cooler approaches to their designs.

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Rising Seas

Rising Seas

What will global warming mean to the San Francisco Bay? QUEST explores how sea level rise could affect Bay Area wetlands, following researchers who are taking sediment cores from local marshes to discover climate history and to get a glimpse of the bay's future.

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