The Science of Sustainability

Chris Bauer

Chris Bauer

Chris Bauer is a Media Producer for QUEST. Chris has nearly 20 years experience working in broadcast television; producing sports, history, technology, science, environment and adventure related programming. He is a two-time winner of the international Society of Environmental Journalists Award for Outstanding Television Story and has received multiple Northern California Emmy Awards. Some of his Quest stories have been featured in the San Francisco Ocean Film Festival, Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival, United Nations Association Film Festival, the BLUE Ocean Film Festival and the Environmental Film Festival in Washington DC. A 5th generation Bay Area resident and a graduate of St. Mary's College of California, his hobbies include canoeing, snowboarding, wood-working and trying to play the ukulele. He and his family live in San Francisco.

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Chris Bauer's Latest Posts

Producer's Notes: Fido Fights Cancer

Producer's Notes: Fido Fights Cancer

I love my dog. For the past ten years, through thick and thin, Brodie has been my happy sidekick, trusted confidant, eager hiking partner and beloved friend. Most of all the kid makes me laugh. He is, I am prone to say, "a glorious twit!"

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Super Ball Fission

Super Ball Fission

As a physics professor at UC Berkeley, Richard Muller considers what his students would need to know — if one were elected president. In today's lesson, he demonstrates the principles of fission and the basics of a nuclear explosion — using super balls!

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Ice Age Bay Area

Ice Age Bay Area

Imagine a vast grassy plain covered with herds of elephants, bison and camels stretching as far as the eye can see. Lions, tigers, wolves and later, humans, hunt the herds on their summer migration. Africa? No, the Bay Area. During the close of the last Ice Age. Take a trip back 20,000 years, to a time when San Francisco Bay was just a riverbed and local wildlife looked a whole lot different.

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Producer's Notes: Ice Age Bay Area

Producer's Notes: Ice Age Bay Area

The rocks, long known as the "Sunset Boulders", have attracted rock climbers for years. I've climbed these rocks before. But like so many other people, I had no idea I was touching history. During the Pleistocene, 10 to 20,000 years ago, this place was very different than it is today, inhabited by massive mega-fauna; bigger elephants, lions, bears and wolves, than we see today.

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Under the Microscope: Science Struggles in Schools

Under the Microscope: Science Struggles in Schools

California ranks second-lowest in the U.S. in fourth and eighth grade science achievement, according to a recent study. Since a large part of California's economy is devoted to technology, it is vital that California get its students up to speed. How bad is the problem? And what are schools and informal science education organizations doing to fill the gap?

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Producer's Notes for Make At Home: Tabletop Linear Accelerator

Producer's Notes for Make At Home: Tabletop Linear Accelerator

My favorite Make projects all seem to have something to do with things that other people might say "Don't try this at home." In this case we went out to the Make Magazine "Test Lab" to learn how to make a small steel ball fly across the room using magnets… good clean fun in my book.

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Producer's Notes for Underwater Wilderness: Creating Marine Protected Areas

Producer's Notes for Underwater Wilderness: Creating Marine Protected Areas

Through the eyes of these scientists, we witness the undersea life in bloom. They clearly have one of the best offices to go to work to each day.

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Underwater Wilderness: Creating Marine Protected Areas

Underwater Wilderness: Creating Marine Protected Areas

California waters are some of the richest in the world. But declines in fish species have led state leaders to begin creating large protected areas, or "no fishing zones," similar to wilderness areas on land. Although controversial with some fishing groups, the zones may help bring back fish, birds and marine mammals currently on the brink.

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MAKE it at Home: Table-Top Linear Accelerator

MAKE it at Home: Table-Top Linear Accelerator

QUEST teams up with Make Magazine to construct the latest must have, do-it-yourself device hacks and science projects. This week well show you how to make a tabletop linear accelerator that demonstrates the finer points of kinetic energy by shooting a steel ball.

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Producer's Notes: Cal Academy Comes To Life

Producer's Notes: Cal Academy Comes To Life

By the time I was ten years old I knew the old California Academy of Sciences building by heart. After countless birthday parties, field trips and family outings, my brother and I, along with our sugar-filled urchin gang of friends and cousins, could have led tours of "the Aquarium."

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Cal Academy Comes To Life

Cal Academy Comes To Life

A great migration is taking place as the California Academy of Sciences moves from its temporary home in downtown San Francisco to its new green building in Golden Gate Park. Join QUEST inside as Cal Academy scientists move live penguins, sharks, eels and millions of other scientific specimens.

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Science Flexes its Muscles

Science Flexes its Muscles

Athletes are racing to get the most out of the human body and are using new technology to do it. But there is a dark side. Anabolic steroids and other performance enhancing drugs have been injected into the mix. But how do they really work? And can new technology catch the cheaters?

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Your Photos on QUEST – Erin Malone

Your Photos on QUEST – Erin Malone

Join QUEST in our latest photography feature about viewers like you who love documenting science, environment and nature imagery here in the Bay Area. This week, meet Erin Malone, who makes beautiful, impressionistic images in a place that many overlook or see as ugly– the subtly hued mud & marsh of South San Francisco Bay.

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Producer's Notes: Tagging Pacific Predators

Producer's Notes: Tagging Pacific Predators

When most of us think of tuna, we think of the can. Maybe we remember "Charlie Tuna" from the old commercials. What many people don't realize is that these amazing animals are at the pinnacle of fish evolution. Tuna are capable of covering vast distances, traversing the entire Pacific Ocean in a matter of days. […]

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Tagging Pacific Predators

Tagging Pacific Predators

It's easy to find them in a can, but the lives of tuna in the open ocean have been a mystery to scientists. Thanks to a tagging program, Monterey Bay Area scientists are learning that these underwater sprinters travel thousands of miles around the Pacific.

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Web Extra: Tagging Pacific Predators Extended Interview

Web Extra: Tagging Pacific Predators Extended Interview

Why are Monterey Bay area scientists putting tuna on treadmills? See an extended interview with scientist Barbara Block at the Tuna Research and Conservation Center about her work to get a picture of their migration routes and ecosystem…through the tuna's eyes.

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Producer's Notes: Ugo Conti's Spider Boat

Producer's Notes: Ugo Conti's Spider Boat

I first met Ugo Conti a number of years ago when we discussed an inflatable boat he had designed to sail from the San Francisco Bay to Hawaii. This adventure was born from Conti's passion for the sea and was somewhat of a follow up to the round-the-world sailing adventures he took with his young […]

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Ugo Conti's Spider Boat

Ugo Conti's Spider Boat

Bay Area engineer Ugo Conti has sailed the world, but has always suffered from seasickness. A queasy stomach became his motivation to design "Proteus" — a spider-like sea craft made for smoother sailing. And it may change the way people take to the high seas.

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Producer's Notes: Disappearing Frogs

Producer's Notes: Disappearing Frogs

A Pacific Chorus FrogWhen I was growing up in the Bay Area the chirping croaks of native tree frogs often serenaded us to sleep. The sound of those little Pacific Chorus frogs calling to each other was always familiar background music to long summer nights. Those were days of catching pollywogs down at the creek […]

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Disappearing Frogs

Disappearing Frogs

Around the world, frogs are declining at an alarming rate due to threats like pollution, disease and climate change. Frogs bridge the gap between water and land habitats, making them the first indicators of ecosystem changes. Meet the Bay Area researchers working to protect frogs across the state and across the world.

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