The Science of Sustainability

Anne Glausser

Anne Glausser

Anne Glausser is the Coordinating Producer for QUEST Ohio. Before taking on this role, she was WCPN 90.3 FM & WVIZ/PBS ideastream’s health reporter and produced award-winning radio pieces. She’s spent time on both coasts (her college mascot was the banana slug!), but grew up in the Midwest and is happy to be back home. She got started in radio at PRI’s Living on Earth, and has also spent time as a researcher at the Harvard School of Public Health. Anne got her SM from MIT’s Graduate Program in Science Writing.

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Anne Glausser's Latest Posts

The Skin of a Building and Why it Matters

The Skin of a Building and Why it Matters

Retrofitting the “skin” of an older building can save energy and money. Climb inside one company’s test chamber with QUEST Ohio to find out more.

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How to Plant a Backyard Rain Garden

How to Plant a Backyard Rain Garden

This growing season, consider planting a different kind of garden, one that will sop up stormwater and take pressure off the sewage system.

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Food Scraps:  An Urbanite’s Dilemma

Food Scraps: An Urbanite’s Dilemma

When it comes to doing what’s best for the environment, compost is king. But sometimes it doesn’t fit into city life. Garbage disposals offer a simpler solution for getting rid of food scraps, but how do they stack up?

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From Coal to Canvas:  An Artist Turns Toxic Runoff into Palette-Worthy Paints

From Coal to Canvas: An Artist Turns Toxic Runoff into Palette-Worthy Paints

In this video from QUEST Ohio, discover how an artist is repurposing runoff from coalmines to create a variety of rich paint pigments—and draw attention to the state’s polluted waterways.

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Vacant Lots Get a Green Makeover

Vacant Lots Get a Green Makeover

Vacant lots are a big problem for cities with population loss, like Cleveland, where researchers are testing a cost-efficient way to transform abandoned land into spaces that revitalize neighborhoods and improve the environment.

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Dredging Up a Problem

Dredging Up a Problem

The Cuyahoga River in northeast Ohio — known for catching fire in the 1960s — relies on frequent dredging to keep the shipping channels open. Now a controversial new proposal to dump the dredged material into Lake Erie has residents worried about contamination of the public water supply.

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Getting the Munchies for Hemp

Getting the Munchies for Hemp

More people are turning to hemp seeds as a source of healthy fats and protein, and as a sustainable crop.

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Why a Dark Sky Matters

Why a Dark Sky Matters

Big city lights may put some dazzle in the night sky, but they also cause problems for people and other creatures attuned to darkness.

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A Better Way to Patch Potholes

A Better Way to Patch Potholes

Inspired by footraces across a giant bathtub of cornstarch, engineering students think they have hit on a more efficient and environmentally friendly way to fix potholes.

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“The Vine That Ate the South” Heads North

“The Vine That Ate the South” Heads North

The invasive vine known as kudzu has twined itself into Southern culture, but it’s a big environmental headache, causing crop and property damage and loss of biodiversity. And now the vine’s coming north.

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Protecting Summer Hang-Outs For Bats

Protecting Summer Hang-Outs For Bats

Bats help humans in a variety of ways, but their populations are declining across the country. Now researchers have created a “bat map” to help save them.

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After the Frack

After the Frack

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a process of extracting natural gas that creates large amounts of contaminated wastewater. QUEST travels to Ohio to investigate how this wastewater is produced and the controversy over how to safely dispose of it.

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Forget the Lawnmower, Hire Sheep

Forget the Lawnmower, Hire Sheep

At a vacant lot in Cleveland, sheep are employed as urban “eco-mowers” — part of a growing number of global initiatives to replace mowing with munching.

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City Chickens: Pets with Perks

City Chickens: Pets with Perks

Take an inside look at the new trend of raising chickens within city limits, and see why the flocks inspire pride for eco-minded owners.

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Farmers Fight Back Against Toxic Algal Blooms

Farmers Fight Back Against Toxic Algal Blooms

Agricultural runoff is the leading cause of recurring algal blooms in Lake Erie. Now farmers are inviting researchers onto their fields to figure out why — and what they can do about it.

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The Living Machine: A Flush Worth Following

The Living Machine: A Flush Worth Following

Engineered to mimic a wetland, an innovative system at Oberlin College uses plants and microbes to recycle wastewater—a process that begins with a trip to the bathroom.

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Restoring the Earth's "Kidneys"

Restoring the Earth's "Kidneys"

Urban development is impeding the ability of native wetlands to serve as natural filters, but efforts are underway in some places to reverse the damage.

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A Difficult Path for Clean Coal

A Difficult Path for Clean Coal

Coal generates half of all the electricity in the U.S. It’s also the biggest source of global-warming emissions and other air pollution. The coal industry says the answer is not to phase out coal, but instead to produce “clean coal.” Anne Glausser of QUEST Ohio reports on the difficult path for clean coal.

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