The Science of Sustainability

Ariana Brocious

Ariana Brocious

Ariana Brocious is the Reporter/Morning Host at NET Radio in Nebraska, where she covers energy, water, culture and Latino issues. A native of the Southwest and graduate of the University of Arizona, she traces her interest in the environment—and how humans interact with it—to her time living in Western Colorado, where she worked as News Director for KVNF Radio, and at High Country News magazine. In her non-working hours she enjoys getting outside, coaxing her vegetable garden along, and experimenting in the kitchen.

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Ariana Brocious's Latest Posts

Getting Up Close with Cranes

Getting Up Close with Cranes

For decades, scientists have studied the annual migration of sandhill cranes through central Nebraska. A new project is using time-lapse cameras to capture and study crane behavior.

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The Science of Measuring Snow

The Science of Measuring Snow

Much of the water flowing through the West starts as snowpack high up in the mountains. A complex system of remote and manual data collection helps water managers calculate how much water they'll have for the season ahead.

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Reconstructing a River for Wildlife

Reconstructing a River for Wildlife

Pulling up vegetation, starting fires, and letting animals graze on riverbanks are just some of the steps being taken to improve habitat for migrating birds, including endangered species.

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Turning Contaminated Sites Into Wildlife Refuges

Turning Contaminated Sites Into Wildlife Refuges

One of the nation’s biggest wildlife refuges used to be a hotbed of military weapons production, and resulting contamination. It’s now been cleaned up and restored as an urban habitat refuge.

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Triple Threat: Trees At Risk From Drought, Heat, And Fire

Triple Threat: Trees At Risk From Drought, Heat, And Fire

In the western U.S., trees are facing a triple threat of heat, drought and wildfire. Despite efforts to find more resilient tree species, some forests may not survive past mid-century.

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